If you like DIY projects, Volkswagen has an offer that might interest you. The automaker is letting visitors to its "glass house" factory in Dresden, Germany, help build e-Golf electric cars.

As of now, visitors to the factory can get hands on at up to five stations on the e-Golf assembly line, VW said in a press release Tuesday.

If you think letting untrained civilians help build cars is a bad idea, note that visitors are supervised by staff at all times.

Vistors to the Dresden factory can book the hands-on experience online, as part of a 2.5 hour tour costing 215 euros, or about $240 at current exchange rates. That includes a "welcome drink"—probably something VW doesn't permit its own assembly crew to partake in on premises.

Built to show off VW's production methods, the Dresden factory was originally built the Phaeton luxury sedan, switching to the e-Golf after that model was discontinued.

Volkswagen e-Golf assembly at Dresden

Volkswagen e-Golf assembly at Dresden

However, cars for the United States market are built in Wolfsburg, Germany. All told, VW has delivered?over 100,000 e-Golfs?to customers.

VW plans to offer the same experience in 2021 with the ID.3 electric car, which will be built in Dresden, among other places. Production is already underway in Zwickau, Germany, and European deliveries are expected to begin in September.

Such an experience sounds worth keeping to help spread the word about electric vehicles, as VW plans to produce millions of them on its MEB platform.

The first MEB-based electric car to reach the U.S. will be the ID.4 crossover. U.S-market cars will initially be sourced from Zwickau, but VW also plans to build the ID.4 at its Chattanooga, Tennessee, factory after 2022. What if VW offered a similar hands-on experience there?